Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Re-Opening Date

Dear Springbank Family,

We have exciting news to share today! After 2 months we are re-opening our doors and we are all enthusiastic to get back to work. Our official first day will be  May 19, 2020 and our administrative staff will begin calling patients this week  to rebook their missed appointments.

If there are patients in a higher risk category please mention this pertinent information to our staff and we will do our best to accommodate you during minimal traffic appointment times.

Covid-19 has been on all of our minds for months and now that it is time to begin our journey back to normalcy we will do it with a healthy dose of caution. We will ease back into things by focusing on dental restorations only and re-introduce hygiene visits in subsequent weeks. We know there are still some reservations about going anywhere in public including the dental office. However, now is a more important time than ever due to the significant connection between oral health and total body health. As a result we realize the importance of making sure everything that can be done is being done.

Although our doors have been closed we have been keeping busy undergoing  modifications  to make your next visits safer and more efficient. Before Covid-19 we already had a rigorous infection control protocol. After Covid-19 we will be taking further safety precautions to eliminate any risks to our patients and our staff. We would like our Springbank Family to be aware of the changes we have made to mitigate any extra risk posed by the virus:

Filtration Units for Clean Air:

We have added air filtration units with Hepa Filters that clean the air around 20 times an hour. These filters remove 99.95% of all microbes as small as 0.03 microns and filter out essentially all bacteria and viruses including Covid-19.

Extra High Volume Evacuation:

In addition to our regular methods we have also added new high volume suctions to decrease the amount of aerosols that are even allowed to escape the mouth to further reduce any risks. This new high volume suction has been shown to remove up to 90% of all aerosols.

Screening and Waiting Room Changes:

For every patient we will be doing a screening (during booking and at arrival) and asking all symptomatic patients to stay at home to avoid any risks. We will continue to ask patients to wait in their vehicles when they arrive until their room is ready at which time we will call to have them come straight in. Also, we ask that all patients who are able to come alone to exemplify proper distancing in the waiting rooms. We have removed items from the areas that cannot be easily wiped and we will be regularly wiping down the common areas throughout the day. Every patient arriving will have their temperature and oxygen levels taken, asked to wash their hands and they will be given a strong anti microbial rinse to further lower the contamination risk.

Extra Protection for Higher Risk Appointments:

To protect our staff and avoid further cross contamination risk we will be wearing gowns, face protection and hair nets for certain higher risk procedures so please do not be alarmed when someone who looks like a bee keeper greets you.

Our Staff:

This week our staff will be undergoing extensive training on extra protocols, appropriate donning and doffing, and strict work flow management. Daily, each staff member will be filling out a Covid-19 clearance form prior to entering the work place. In addition, temperature readings and oxygen levels will measured upon arrival. It is of utmost importance that each team member is healthy to alleviate any of your concerns.

Scheduling Changes:

Appointments will be managed to allow for more social distancing between patients. Unfortunately,  that may mean that initially you are offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.

As we continue to adapt to the new guidelines and new information about the virus we ask for your continued patience. Your safety and the safety of our staff are our top priority and we will not put either at risk. There will undoubtedly be some small road bumps as we make our way through this together.

We also want to thank you all for your kind words and support throughout all of this. We have been reminded how lucky we are to have you all as patients. It has been a trying time but we have also learned a tremendous amount about ourselves, our connection to the community and how we can best serve our city. Covid-19 reinforces the strong focus we have put on the importance of health and the connection between your mouth and the rest of your body.

We are confident we will get through this together and come out even stronger on the other side. Thank you all again and please feel free to reach out to us with any questions or concerns. We look forward to seeing you all again soon and remember to continue to physically distance but socially connect. 

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Emergency Dental Services

By Joey & Luke

Springbank Dental Centre has introduced same-day emergency dental services. Our commitment to area residents is that they will be seen the same day to assess dental concerns or emergencies so they do not remain in discomfort. Our team at Springbank Dental Centre believes no one should be left in pain for any period of time.

Anyone in the surrounding areas may call to be seen during office hours. Springbank Dental Centre hours are updated regularly on our website.

We accept all employer-sponsored dental plans. Government dental plans and those non-insured can pay at the end of their visit via cash, debit or credit card.

Types of dental emergencies and how to deal with them

Avulsed tooth (tooth knocked out)

If a tooth has been knocked clean out of the mouth, it is essential to see a dentist immediately. When a tooth exits the mouth, tissues, nerves, and blood vessels become damaged. If the tooth can be placed back into its socket within an hour, there is a chance the tissues will grow to support the tooth once again.

Here are some steps to take:

  1. Call our office.
  2. Pick up the tooth by the crown and rinse it under warm water. DO NOT touch the root.
  3. If possible, place it back into its socket – if not tuck it into the cheek pouch.
  4. If the tooth cannot be placed in the mouth, put the tooth into a cup of milk, saliva, or water as a last resort. It is important to keep the tooth from drying out.
  5. Get to our office, quickly and safely.

We will try to replace the tooth in its natural socket. In some cases, the tooth will reattach, but if the inner mechanisms of the teeth are seriously damaged, root canal therapy might be necessary.

Lost filling or crown

Usually, a crown or filling comes loose while eating. Once it is out of the mouth, the affected tooth may be incredibly sensitive to temperature changes and pressure. Crowns generally become loose because the tooth beneath is decaying. The decay causes shape changes in the teeth – meaning that the crown no longer fits.

If a crown has dropped out of the mouth, make a dental appointment as soon as possible. Keep the crown in a cool, safe place because there is a possibility that we can reinsert it. If the crown is out of the mouth for a long period of time, the teeth may shift or sustain further damage.

When we are not immediately accessible, here are the steps to take:

  1. Apply clove oil to the tooth to alleviate pain.
  2. Clean the crown, and affix it onto the tooth with dental cement. This can be purchased at a local pharmacy.
  3. If the crown is lost, smear the top of the tooth with dental cement to alleviate discomfort.
  4. DO NOT use any kind of glue to affix the crown.

We will check the crown to see if it still fits. If it does, it will be reattached to the tooth. Where decay is noted, this will be treated and a new crown will be made.

Cracked or broken teeth

The teeth are strong, but they are still prone to fractures, cracks, and breaks. Sometimes fractures are fairly painless, but if the crack extends down into the root, it is likely that the pain will be extreme. Fractures, cracks, and breaks can take several different forms, but are generally caused by trauma, grinding, and biting. If a tooth has been fractured or cracked, there is no alternative but to schedule an appointment as quickly as possible.

Where a segment of tooth has been broken off, here are some steps that can be taken at home:

  1. Call our office.
  2. Rinse the tooth fragment and the mouth with lukewarm water.
  3. Apply gauze to the area for ten minutes if there is bleeding.
  4. Place a cold, damp dishtowel on the cheek to minimize swelling and pain.
  5. Cover the affected area with over-the-counter dental cement if you cannot see us immediately.
  6. Take a topical pain reliever.

The nature of the break or fracture will limit what we are able to do. If a fracture or crack extends into the root, root canal therapy is often the most effective way to retain the tooth. In the case of a complete break, your dentist will usually affix the fragment back onto the tooth as a temporary measure.

Dislodged/loose teeth

When a tooth has been dislodged or loosened from its socket by trauma or decay, it might be possible to save it. If the tooth remains in the mouth still attached to the blood vessels and nerves, there is a good chance root canal therapy will not be necessary.

It is important to call our office immediately to make an appointment. In the meantime, use a cold compress and over-the-counter medications to relieve pain. Your dentist will reposition the tooth and add splints to stabilize it. If the tooth fails to heal, root canal therapy might be required.

If you are experiencing a dental emergency call our office today.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Snoring and Sleep Apnea


By Joey & Luke

Sleep apnea is quite prevalent; statistics out of the US quote approximately 12 million people have some degree of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea occurs when the airway is obstructed by the tongue and soft tissues of the throat during sleep.

When the airway is constricted and oxygen is not getting into the lungs for circulation to the rest of the body the brain senses this, the heart rate increases and ultimately the person wakes up. When this cycle continues during the night, a sleep deficiency develops as the person is not able to get much needed deep restorative sleep called REM sleep. As well this cycle of sleep/waking has significant negative effect on the heart.

Sleep apnea can affect every organ system. It is linked to weight gain, poor memory, heart attack, stroke, depression, diabetes hypertension, gastric reflux, libido, sleepiness and ADHD in children.

Signs and symptoms of sleep apnea are snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, awakening at night with gasping or choking and fragmented, and non-refreshing light sleep.

If any of these signs or symptoms are common to you it is important to see your physician so they can assist in providing a diagnosis. Your physician may send you to a sleep clinic for a sleep study, also called a polysomnogram. During a sleep study, you will sleep overnight at the clinic with small sensors attached to you to monitor your sleep patterns. After this is complete the physician will review the results of the study to see if treatment is needed.

A few treatment options for sleep apnea exist.

A CPAP machine is a non-surgical option. CPAP which means continuous positive airway pressure consists of a machine that delivers air under pressure through the nose while you sleep to help prevent constriction of the airway.

Surgical management also exists for sleep apnea. These options are used mostly in severe cases of sleep apnea. All of the surgical procedures available include removal of soft tissue in the oral cavity and throat to prevent to prevent constriction while a person sleeps. These surgeries do require significant post-operative discomfort and healing time.

Another treatment option for sleep apnea is a dental appliance called a Mandibular Advancement Appliance. These appliances prevent the lower jaw from falling back when you sleep which keeps the tongue forward and out of the airway. These appliances work best in mild to moderate sleep apnea.

At Springbank Dental Centre ~ we work closely with patients who have been diagnosed with sleep apnea as well as with their physicians to make and monitor dental appliances as an alternative to CPAP.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Acid Reflux Disease and Your Oral Cavity

By Joey & Luke

For those that live with acid reflux disease, they are all too familiar with the painful burning sensation that occurs when stomach contents come back up into the esophagus. Acid reflux disease otherwise known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may also have other symptoms such as; persistent heartburn, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, bad breath, regurgitation, sour taste in the mouth and nausea. The high acidity level of the stomach contents has the potential to cause irritation and damage to the lining of the esophagus when reflux occurs. As well, the increased acidity can also affect the oral cavity.

Tooth enamel can start to dissolve at a pH of 5.5. When the acid level increases in the mouth and the pH lowers, the enamel on the teeth can start to deteriorate. If enamel is exposed to a lower pH repeatedly, complete enamel breakdown may occur. Changes in the acidity level in the mouth can occur due to food consumption, decreased salivary flow, eating disorders, medications, and acid reflux. Acid reflux is also common in those who have untreated sleep apnea.

The acid in the stomach has a pH of around 2. When acid comes up the esophagus into the mouth it drops the oral pH and enamel degradation can occur. When this occurs repeatedly the teeth can become eroded, exposing the non-protective inner portion of the teeth.

Symptoms of tooth erosion

The first step is obtaining a diagnosis and treatment from your physician. It is important to find a treatment modality that prevents recurrent acid reflux into the mouth prior to repairing tooth erosion because the repair may not last if reflux continues. Depending on the severity of tooth erosion dental repair may include; fillings, bonding, veneers and/or dental crowns (caps).

Tips to care for your teeth if you have reflux

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Dental Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

By Joey & Luke

Many factors go into determining a person’s odds of having a heart attack and stroke. These are two factors you may not be aware of.

Sleep Apnea is a breathing disorder that occurs at night while you sleep and may put you at increased risk of both heart attack and stroke. How are these two things connected? At night when a person falls asleep the soft tissue in the upper airway (tongue and soft palate) collapse when you relax into sleep and prevent air from traveling to the lungs which causes the person to arouse from sleep. This can happen hundreds of times per night and decreases oxygen saturation in the bloodstream. Sleep apnea can also raise adrenaline (the fight or flight chemical produced by the body) when your brain needs to wake you up as your airway obstructs – if this happens many times every hour as in moderate-severe apnea, it’s like running a marathon every night and if you have any underlying cardiac condition, this will increase your risk of heart attack.

Patients who have symptoms of sleep apnea such as; snoring, daytime fatigue, morning headaches or arouse during sleep frequently should see their physician. At Springbank Dental Centre we work hand and hand with our patients and their respective physicians to ensure that we screen our patients and refer accordingly for treatment. Depending on the severity and other factors, a dental appliance may even be an option for you.

Periodontal Disease may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. When you eat, food becomes trapped between your teeth and gums. When this food sits it is consumed by oral bacteria and turns into soft dental plaque. The bacteria and the toxin-laden plaque lies against the soft tissue in the mouth which irritates it and infection/inflammatory response begins. The inflammatory response brings many types of blood cells to the site to start fighting the “infection” that is present and in turn inflammation in the body is increased which raises the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

To reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease floss daily. Brushing can remove plaque above the gum line, but it cannot reach the harmful plaque and bacteria that is lodged underneath the gums-it is this plaque that is the most harmful to the gums, bone and other supporting structures of the teeth. It is recommended to have harmful plaque and tartar removed in a minimum of 2-3 times per year in a healthy mouth if diseases such as gingivitis or periodontal disease is present it is recommended to have teeth cleaned by the dental hygienist 3-4 per year.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Do you have bad breath?

By Joey & Luke

Bad breath otherwise known as halitosis can affect anyone at one time or another. In most circumstances it is a temporary condition and due to food or beverage that was consumed prior. In other situations bad breath becomes a chronic condition and can be due to a variety of factors such as; digestive problems, dry mouth due to medications and aging, poor oral hygiene, mouth breathing, a diet high refined carbohydrates, smoking, enlarged/infected tonsils/adenoids/sinuses and untreated oral infections.

With simple bad breath, a few tips can help to keep your breath fresh between professional dental visits.

If bad breath continues after using these tips consistently, then further investigation may be warranted by both the dentist and physician.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

A Lifetime of Oral Health

By Joey & Luke

Most people understand that diet and exercise play a large part in keeping our bodies healthy. Besides diet and exercise practicing positive oral hygiene habits and keeping our mouths healthy go a long way in keeping our body healthy.

Deficient oral hygiene habits and poor oral health can affect one’s quality of life. Infections within the mouth, pain and missing teeth can affect the way a person speaks, eats and talks. These oral health issues can negatively impact a person’s quality of life by affecting mental, physical and social well-being. 

Oral infection and disease, like any other condition in the body needs to be treated at the first signs to prevent progression and super infection. Infections in the mouth can be acute or chronic. Typically, acute infections produce marked symptoms such as pain, bleeding, pus and swelling while chronic infections these symptoms may present they are less likely to do so.

Chronic infections in the mouth may show symptoms such as mild bleeding, swelling and tenderness which may not be as alarming as an infection that shows up overnight. Both are equally as important to treat in a timely manner. A chronic infection is a serious problem that should not be ignored. Research in the last 10-20 years has proved the association between oral disease and other health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and pre-term/low birth weight babies. Evidence from research also shows that oral infection and disease can aggravate other health conditions and keeping a healthy mouth is important part of a healthy body.

Follow these 5 tips to positive oral health!

  1. See your dentist as recommended. Seeing your dentist every 6 months does not work for everyone, for some who have a chronic oral disease like periodontitis they may need a visit every 3 months. Frequency of dental visits is dependent on the health of the oral cavity, follow your dentists’ recommendations to keep your mouth healthy!
  2. Practice good oral hygiene at home! Brushing is important 2-3 times day, but did you know that flossing is one of the most important things you can do for your oral health? Flossing cleans the area where sticky plaque laden with bacteria resides. This sticky bacteria laden plaque can cause cavities and gum disease. The goal is to floss your teeth 1x day.
  3. Eat a healthy varied diet! The vitamins and minerals that come from healthy foods may help you fight oral diseases as well as keep your gums, bones and jawbone strong against bacteria.
  4. Check your own mouth regularly. You can identify potential problems in your own mouth. Look for signs of gum disease such as red, shiny, puffy, sore or sensitive gums. Check for areas that bleed when you brush or floss or bad breath that won’t go away. While you are in your mouth look for signs of oral cancer which may show as sores that do not heal within 2 weeks, white/red patches, numbness or tingling, small lumps and thickening on the sides/bottom of the tongue, the floor or roof of your mouth the inside of the cheeks or the gums. If you identify any of these see your dentist as soon as possible for an oral examination.
  5. Do not smoke or chew tobacco. Smoking and chewing tobacco are both dangerous to your oral health. Tobacco in general is a major cause of tooth loss through gum disease and may lead to oral cancer. Tobacco can increase your risk of heart disease and a variety of systemic cancers.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Changes in Dentistry Over the Past 30 Years

By Joey & Luke

Dentistry has changed immensely over the last 30 years. Not only has the equipment, products and services changed but so has the manner in which we provide dental treatment.

In the past 30 years, there has been a complete paradigm shift from reactive to preventative dentistry. Reactive dentistry deals with treating according to a patient’s symptoms, usually when a disease process is quite far along or advanced. Treating dental disease in this fashion provides poor outcomes for the patient, sometimes resulting in tooth loss or further deterioration of the oral cavity.

Currently, dentistry is very much prevention-oriented. This means that instead of reacting to a problem/disease when it is far advanced, the dental treatment we provide is aimed to prevent dental problems/disease before they start or at least before they have a chance to cause irreversible damage. With the prevention-oriented model of care comes better outcomes – ultimately prevention of disease and people keeping their teeth for life.

When you attend your dental appointment every 3, 4 or 6 months to see your dentist and dental hygienist they are examining your oral cavity for early signs of disease. These early warning signs can allow us to treat a disease process prior to it taking hold and causing destruction. At times, some forms of dental disease can even be reversed.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

What are Dental Sealants?

By Joey & Luke

Catch Cavities Early!

For many children and adults, dental decay starts in the deep pits and grooves of teeth. These areas can be hard to clean and thus cavities may start. Knowing this your dentist may recommend sealants be placed on your child’s teeth to help prevent dental decay. Sealants can prevent decay on tooth surfaces with pits and grooves where dental plaque can stick to the tooth.

What is a dental sealant? 

A dental sealant is a plastic dental material that is placed over the pits and grooves on teeth to prevent food from sticking in them and cavities forming. The sealant bonds onto the pits and grooves which acts as a barrier protecting the enamel from dental plaque and acids that cause cavities. Sealants are typically not used on teeth that already have fillings. Sealants are a preventative dental procedure but should be a part of total preventative dental care including brushing, flossing, healthy food choices, optimal fluoride exposure, and regular dental visits.

How is a dental sealant placed? 

Dental sealants can be placed by dentists and dental hygienists. The procedure is quick and painless. The pits and grooves of the teeth are fully cleaned and treated with a dental bond that allows the sealant material to stick. The sealant is then painted on as liquid and hardens with light activation into a solid shell on the tooth.

Do I need a fluoride toothpaste if I have sealants? 

Fluorides such as those in some community’s water supply, toothpaste, gels, varnishes, and mouthwashes also help prevent cavities. Fluoride and dental sealants are both a part of preventative dental care.

How long do sealants last? 

Sealants usually hold up quite well under the force of normal eating and chewing. They may last several years before another application is needed. As long as the sealant is in place it will protect the pits and grooves of that tooth from decay. On regular dental visits, your dental professional will check to see if it needs to be replaced.

Who is a candidate for sealants? 

Typically sealants are placed on children once a tooth erupts to prevent a cavity from forming on it. Some adults who are high risk for dental decay may also be candidates for sealants. Your dentist can determine which teeth are best for a dental sealant.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies

Call Us Today! (587) 317‑9910 NEW PATIENTS: (403) 277‑7464 | 116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9

Oral Disease Prevention

By Joey & Luke

Catch Cavities Early!

Most people are aware that cavities that are untreated can cause pain, infection and possibly even tooth loss. Dental decay is one of the world’s most common diseases. With proper home care and regular examinations by the dentist, cavities can be prevented and detected before they cause serious damage. Cavities are caused by certain strains of oral bacteria.

Cavities that are just starting and small may not have any symptoms, so it is essential to maintain the checkup schedule as recommended by your dentist for early detection.

Things to look for at home:

In some areas, you may be at a higher risk of dental decay as our city water is non-fluoridated. Daily fluoride both through ingestion and topical application is vital for the prevention of cavities.

Catch Gum Disease Early!

Gum disease is linked to and may impact, other serious health issues including type 2 diabetes. Gingivitis is an early form of gum disease which affects the gum tissue only. Periodontitis is the destruction of oral tissues down into the jawbone and other supporting structures of the teeth. Both diseases are caused by certain strains of oral bacteria.

Things to look for at home:

If you have been diagnosed by your dentist in the past with gingivitis or periodontal disease you are at a higher risk for developing it in the future.

Springbank Dental Centre

Dr. Luke Szott and Dr. Joey Woo
116-30 Springborough Boulevard SW
Calgary, Alberta T3H 0N9
New Patients: (403) 277‑7464
Existing Patients: (587) 317‑9910
Fax: (403) 265‑2077

[email protected]

Copyright 2020 Springbank Dental Centre & Dental Growth Strategies | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Dental Growth Strategies